Impossible Objects in Real Life no.2

If you liked “Impossible Objects in Real Life” and “Lego Escher Illusion”, you will like this one as well. Here you can see how this construction was built. Also don’t forget to open this post (click on the white tittle) and see more impossible structures constructed in real life.





Click Here for a RANDOM Optical Illusion

28 Replies to “Impossible Objects in Real Life no.2”

  1. the last one is that there is a piece of wood behind where the dog is on. the camera angle makes it look like the dog is hanging on the board, but still on the grass. its all in the point of view your looking at it from. the board isnt really attached to the house.

  2. There is an illusion on Criss Angel where it looks like he’s standing in a box hanging from a tree. Then he walks out of the box, it looks like he walked through it. But when the camera angle moves. It shows this ‘box’ is actually 2 pieces.

  3. About the semi-last, where the girl is sitting on the end of the chair, if you look closely where she is sitting, the is a wall behind her that keeps her on the chair. So guys, you couldn’t fool us with that one.

  4. I saw thw second and fourth ones before.
    Hint for fourth one: The girl has her legs sliced off and stuck on somewhere else!

  5. just as Acacia says, the last one is just two seperate pieces. the piece in front is the base of the house and four poles sticking up from the corners. The piece in back is the “roof”, a triangular prism. By lining the two up correctly it looks like an impossible house.

  6. This is the solution for the impossible ledge: The girl has her legs cut off, as I said earlier. The ledge looks like a half a chisel with the tapering bit sloping this way if you look at it from the side: /(Pointing downwards.) The boy simply is glued on the ledge. At this angle, the taper of the ledge disappears.

  7. The doghouse was featured on the cover of the October 1983 issue of Games magazine.

    “Photographer Walter Wick built the doghouse with carefully placed gaps between some boards and carefully misplaced pieces elsewhere. The optical illusion snaps into place when the structure is photographed from one precise point of view — the one used to shoot the cover photo.”

    Here’s a link to Walter Wick’s website.

  8. no its the cage itself; follow the lines of the illusion and you’ll see that one side of the cage at the top for example leads to the bottom of the opposite corner, not straight down.

  9. if you look at the last picture next to the black and white dog look at the planks one of them is in front of the other which wouldnt work….then if you study the parts around the door you find more cases like this

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