Upside-Down Face Illusion

The connection I get on this island is terrible. Please take this into consideration before sending nasty email messages :) I am aware things are going slow lately, but in week or so I’ll be back running at full speed again. For today I prepared an interesting multiple meaning illusion. The artistic image below represents either a general of some sort, or something you should be able to see. Can you spot the second meaning? Not to forget, I assigned comments moderation to my brother, webmaster of “Mighty Magic Tricks“, so you should see them appear regularly again. Enjoy the rest of the summer, I will for sure!

87 Replies to “Upside-Down Face Illusion”

  1. Wow that’s cool… except that El Dragon has an elephant trunk coming out of his head! Anyway thats hilarious, “EL ELEFANTE” hehehe

  2. well…the first picture says “el dragon” on it. pretty confusing, since its not a dragon.
    0.o
    but then the second picture says “el elefante” and…it is an elephant. huh. i think thats kinda weird.

  3. an elephant. isn’t the first one suppose to be a dragon? i don’t see a dragon but the writing below it says dragon, unless that means general in some language. well the sacond one is an elephant. it says “elefant” under it. so it’s kinda obviouse.

  4. so the first one is supposed to be a dragon (or a guy named dragon?), and the second is supposed to be an elephant? what’s on the top half of the elephant though? and what’s in the background? it’s kinda hard to see, but it’s not bad.

  5. dude, im like 13 years old and i got it in like, 2 seconds, it says on the bottom and i saw it too. unless you dont know what the spanish word is, but thats not that hard to figure out….

  6. EL Dragon is spanish for “Dragoon”

    Dragoon is the traditional name for a soldier trained to fight on foot but transport himself on horseback, in use especially during the 17th and early 18th centuries.

  7. According to Alat-vista Babelfish, Spanish Dragon translates to Dragoon, which Wiktionary defined as: (military) horse soldier; cavalryman, that use horses for mobility, but fight dismounted.

  8. Alta-Vista Babelfish indicates that dragon in Spanish means Dragoon in English. Wiktionary defines Dragoon as: (military) horse soldier; cavalryman, that use horses for mobility, but fight dismounted. Obvious meanings unless there is something else hidden there.

  9. As I look at the eye not associated with the elephant, I see what looks to be a man’s face and a warrior helmet, perhaps his battle name is the dragon. the elephant was obvious. Nice job!

  10. *IMPORTANT INFORMATION!*
    Dragon does NOT mean dragon in that language!
    A dragon is like a Guard or something like that!
    *IMPORTANT INFORMATION*

  11. El Dragon means a member of a European (Spain) military unit trained and armed to fight mounted or on foot. There’s not supposed to be a dragon.

  12. Re: Why does the first picture say el dragon?

    El dragon is spanish which translates to the dragoon in english which means – mounted infantryman: in European armies of the 17th and 18th centuries, a mounted infantryman armed with a carbine. via MSN encarta. It can also mean a cavalryman.

  13. Re: Why does the first picture say el dragon?

    El dragon which is spanish translates in english to the dragoon which means (via MSN encarta)-mounted infantryman: in European armies of the 17th and 18th centuries, a mounted infantryman armed with a carbine. It can also mean cavalryman.

  14. it’s possible “dragon” is a metaphor., providing a social commentary on the ruthlessness of war and a drive for power

  15. the one on the right looks like a guy is wearing a helmet. but the one on the left looks like a guy’s head is getting bitten by a fish.

  16. El Dragon is Spanish and has got nothing to do with a “dragon”. It is a military person, the translation would be “dragoon” In German, it would be “Der Dragoner”

  17. el dragon is spanish for the dragoon which is A member of a European military unit trained and armed to fight mounted or on foot.

  18. el dragon is spanish for the dragoon which is a A member of a European military unit trained and armed to fight mounted or on foot

  19. El Dragon does not mean a dragon. But is the Spanish word for “a dragoon” a heavily armed trooper in some European armies of the 17th and 18th centuries.
    Another definition said this:
    “A dragoon is a soldier trained to fight on foot, but transport himself on horseback. In other words, they move as cavalry but fight as infantry. The name derives from their primary weapon, a carbine or short musket called the dragon. Sometimes dragon carbines are said to be called as such because they “breathed fire” — a reference to the smoke they emitted when fired.”
    I looked it up because it confused me too.

  20. Dragon in this case means Dragoon. Both Dragon and Dragoon are spelled Dragon in Spanish, except Dragoon has an accent mark over the o. The problem is that capital letters don’t get accent marks. So you can’t tell the difference. But yeah, it’s a dragoon, or soldier on horseback, not dragon.

  21. I’m pretty sure that “El Dragon” is referring to the man in the first picture. Maybe it’s a reference to his style of combat.

    And I definately see the elephant in the second photo.

  22. So there is a general or whatever. Does “The Dragon” mean that he is somehow an evil being that steals the ivory from the elephant instead of how dragons steal maidens?
    Is that the meaning behind it? I dont know.. very nice though, I like it

  23. “El dragon” is Spanish for “the dragoon” (not “the dragon”). A dragoon is a member of a European military unit composed of heavily armed cavalrymen.

  24. the first picture says that it is a dragon but i thing that it is displaying a metiphore…that the man is like a dragon. and the second picture is a elephant.

  25. OK, just to hopefully remove some confusion everyone seems to thing it’s supposed to be a dragon. It’s not, it’s just not in english.

    “El dragon” is like the english equivalent of “a dragoon” or more generically “a soldier”, a dragoon is a particular type of soldier.

  26. el dragon translates int dragoon – meaning 1. a member of any of a British cavalry regiments. 2. (historical) a mounted infantryman armed with a carbine.
    — ORIGIN originally denoting a kind of carbine or musket, thought of as breathing fire: from French for dragon.

  27. i think that El Dragon is the name of a king, knight or some other royalty…
    And his “pet” or just a random animal is El Elefante (and yeah, it’s with an f).
    But i don’t know… I wonder if just seeing the people (and animal) is the actual meaning or what?? :( so yeah
    Caio

  28. Heh, many people seem to be quite confused by the fact that the dragon they see, is in fact a man. Simple answer, ‘el Dragon’ translated into English is ‘a dragoon’. A dragoon is a type of soldier, more information here: Wikipedia on dragoons.
    See, PC games aren’t always bad. :P

  29. “El Dragon” in Spanish doesn’t always mean “Dragon” It also means “Dragoon”. Dragoon is the traditional name for a soldier trained to fight on foot but transport himself on horseback, in use especially during the 17th and early 18th centuries.

    So, its Dragoon one way and Elephant the other.

  30. The first one doesn’t say “the dragon”. It says “El Dragon” which translates to “The Dragoon” and a dragoon is soldier.

  31. (in response to gregg)

    im argentinian and i know that “el dragon” means the dragon only, not dragoon.
    where are you from?
    if you’re not espanish or latinamerican, please dont talk .

    YO, ARGENTINO!

  32. .. Well we’ve all seen both, but does anybody else notice that the elephant has a rather LARGE head and a rather SMALl body?

    Good illusion none the less. I think the trunk out of the mans head could use a little work, but hey, I’m not le artist!

  33. i imagine this is suppossed to be Hannibal, the Carthegenian general of antiquity who crossed the Alps with an army that included elephant calvary.

  34. I do believe that “el dragon” does not mean a dragon, but is in fact the spanish for a dragoon. A dragoon was a soldier – usually on horseback, but he fired a musket from which fire emanated with each shot. This was thought to be reminiscent of a fire breathing dragon.
    He could be one of Hannibal’s dragoons, who rode an Elephant rather than a horse.

  35. The reason you cant see a dragon is because its not supposed to be a dragon. El dragon means dragoon in spanish. A dragoon is a type of warrior. Hence the guy wearing a helmet.

  36. i’m confused |:
    why couldn’t he just say what he meant?
    i mean i love mysteries and all
    but i need to know what this is!
    er i’m not gonna be able to sleep at nite!
    damn it.
    haha and yeah those translators don’t always work
    i speak spanish and i’m 100% sure that
    el dragon means the dragon
    so bam!
    :DD

  37. Uhm- I see the Elephant yes, but I see no dragon? Although i think i see A Roman guy(person)?? Yea, is it just me?

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